Reality Villainess Tells All! #Review @bugrobertson @benflajnik

I Didn't Come Here to Make Friends: Confessions of a Reality Show Villain
I Didn’t Come Here to Make Friends: Confessions of a Reality Show Villain by Courtney Robertson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Courtney Robinson Robertson was the girl we loved to hate. I’m a big fan of the Bachelor/ette franchise as a general rule, but Courtney really brought the kind of pain to the show that hooked us viewers in. I started off this review saying she was demonized, but I think everybody’s aware, especially herself, that she was fully aware of her own behaviors and how they affected people.

Anyway, this is not a review on Courtney’s personality flaws, but the book she wrote highlighting her life thus far which focuses heavily on her time with Ben Flajnik, The Bachelor’s 16th bachelor.

A bit of backstory starts us off, name­dropping as we go (Jesse Metcalfe, Adrian Grenier, Gerard Butler), where Courtney does her very best to set herself up as an awkward underdog whose ugly duckling difficulties in her teens and early 20s are intended to endear us to her. She stumbled into modeling completely unaware of her beauty as if she felt undeserving of the attention.

I suppose that angle may work for some readers, but … hee. Not me.

In reality, and per the Bachelor show we all participated in as voyeurs, Courtney is exactly as she presented. I wish, as a reader and a viewer, she’d just embrace her inner bitch because it is what it is and it was what it was. She was catty and sassy as often as possible on the show, and attempting to play it off as “stand-up comedian gone bad” is just kind of pathetic.

None of what’s written above, however, gives a pass to how Ben Flajnik treated Courtney post-Bachelor unreality. Courtney is definitely giving her side of the story in this painstakingly detailed retelling of events, and there would likely be a difference of opinion were we to compare notes with Ben, but he came off light on integrity on the show itself long before this book was neuron firing. That his behavior as Courtney describes it matches exactly what I would have expected is no coincidence nor is it a shock.

Long story short: I believe the charge that Ben Flajnik went on both Bachelorette AND Bachelor in order to hawk his winery & wine to be true.

As to why Courtney wrote this book? I think she’s a big-time narcissist and has long-harbored resentment that she came off as terribly as she did on the show (even though it was by her own hand — thus is the insanity of narcissism) and can’t stand how Ben has talked poorly about her in the press for years. She wants to paint herself in the halo-glow of innocence via this book and point the wicked wand at Ben. It won’t work, in my opinion, but she can have fun trying.

The secondary purpose for her writing this book is that I believe she desperately wants to be The Bachelorette, and in my opinion, they should let her do it. The ratings will be sky-effin-high (I’ll for sure watch!!!). Make it a celebrity version since the bar has been raised so high for her, and holy crap. Show success.

One thing I really have to admit to – while reading the book I followed along as closely as I could with YouTube clips and media stories / pictures to go along with what she was reporting. It was a really lot of fun. To know the insider knowledge of how terribly bad her relationship was with Ben by the time they got to the Wet Republic pool party was awesome to then run over and look at the pictures and try to see the misery in their faces.

Overall this book was a super-fast read and highly entertaining. It’s light and fun – not deep or difficult or cerebral at all. Be ready to feel like you’re watching a 10-car pileup in wicked slow motion while eating popcorn and drinking cheap wine (not Ben’s).

Disclaimer: I was provided a digital copy of this book in order to read and provide an honest review.

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