Tag Archives: adventure

New Lands: The Chronicles of Egg Book 2 by Geoff Rodkey

Egg, Millicent and Guts are back for their next adventure in the second offering from Geoff Rodkey in the Chronicles of Egg.

This adventure is just as quirky and fun as the first. And while their aren’t any field pirates, there are some fun new characters. We also learn quite a bit more about all of our main characters. In particular Guts becomes more of a rounded out real person. Rodkey gives us some beautiful glimpses into Guts’ soul and hints at his past. I can only hope the next installment will answer even more of the questions I have about this intriguing character.

Egg comes into his own more as well. In the first book we began to see him step out from the shadow of his family and their loss. Now we see him start to mature as he accepts the reality of what his family actually was. He finally begins to see his father, brother and sister as they really were – which allows him to shed the heavy weight of his past and begin to move forward. We learn more about the family as well, including a long lost uncle who makes himself known.

Millicent also does a lot of maturing in this book. Rodkey does a credible job of making a believable transition from adoring daughter to skeptical young woman for her. Her inner turmoil at accepting the character of her own father and rejecting that life is amazingly understated yet very present.

OH – and there are natives that want to sacrifice them, rumors of ancient weapons and some transcendental guitar playing. Yes you read that right.

The quirky sense of whimsy that pervaded the first book is just as evident in the second installment. The slightly macabre undertones to some of the scenes is also present. All in all this makes for an exciting read that will take you by surprise and keep you interested.

I was provided a gratis copy of the book for review.

Deadweather and Sunrise – The Chronicles of Egg

cover24769-small

Well dagnabit – now I have one more YA fiction series to add to my list. One more series that I have to keep up with and wait impatiently between release dates for. Why? Because this is an awesome new series.

Rodkey has created a fascinating world. There are elements of fantasy mixed with allusions to our actual history. It is a complex world that took a couple of chapters to begin to fully grasp, but was well worth it.

The story begins with Egbert narrating his own tale. From the start it is made very clear that he doesn’t quite fit in with the rest of his family. His brother and sister are terrors – and that maybe putting it mildly. His father is a bit of an enigma – I am optimistically hoping we will learn more about him in another book.

Egbert lives on an island in the middle of an ocean that is populated by pirates. All different kinds of pirates. Some of the descriptions of house pirates and field pirates has me sniggering out loud. The creation of the inhabitants of the island and the descriptions of life there are priceless and cleverly unique.

Egbert is a very real young boy. He is not perfect. He stumbles through his misadventures in a slightly comical way, but you are always rooting for him.

One thing that Rodkey does extremely well is mixing in a believable amount of truly frightening experiences and circumstances without getting weighed down by it. The novel still keeps its upbeat optimistic feel. An excellent example of this is the character of Guts, yes, that is his name. I don’t want to give anything away – so just keep an eye out for him.

Millicent is another intriguing character. Despite not appearing through the entire middle of the book we manage to see a remarkable amount of character growth with her. She becomes a much more complex and interesting person that I was expecting.

I am finishing with this review now so I can go read the next book.

You should pick up the first book.

Now.

 

I was provided a gratis copy of this book for review.

 

Lichgates by S.M. Boyce

I love finding completely new fantasy worlds. Especially when they are well thought out and vivid.

That is what I found in “Lichgates” by S.M. Boyce.

Kara Magari gets to do something so many of us science fantasy junkies would love to do. Enter a fantasy realm and become a figure of legend. Three chapters in and I was already so jealous of this chick.

Not that it is all rainbows and lollipops for her. Boyce has a created a history for Kara that makes it easily believable that she would choose to devote herself to this new realm and put our world in her past. While that may seem like a small thing it is often one of the few loose ends in otherwise well-crafted books. A big pat on the back to Boyce for doing this well.

Ourea is a beautiful world. It has been well planned and shows sparks of creativity is the peoples that populate it. There are hints of some of our favorite races from other fantasy realms – but no blatant rip-offs. It is more of a nod to those races. The ruling hierarchy and how it works is truly fascinating. I am excited to see how that plays out.

The concept of personal freedom takes on a very literal meaning in this book. The debates we normally see around this issue take on a more real as opposed to philosophical tone because of this.

There was a little awkwardness in the dialogue at the beginning but after the first few chapters this disappeared. Perhaps the beginning chapters could use a slight tweaking to fix this.

Braeden is a fantastic character. Multifaceted and intriguing. Talk about taking battling an inner demon to a new level, Boyce has done it in this complex character.

I am excited to see what this series brings.

 

I was provided a copy of this book for review.

The Lost Prince by Julie Kagawa

Usually I really hate starting a series in the middle or anywhere other than with the first book, so it was with a bit of trepidation that I started The Lost Prince. This is book 5 in a series. I was pleasantly surprised to find that this did not keep me from enjoying the book at all.

Julie Kagawa does a wonderful job creating a story that can stand on its own, but still feels like it belongs in a larger whole. That is difficult to do. Perhaps it was made easier because this book starts the story of a different character than the other 4 books. Whatever it is – it works.

There have been a multitude of faerie (fairy) books in the last few years – some of them have been really great – the majority have been rather weak. It is hard to take was is essentially a well-known concept that everyone has some knowledge of (though very few actually know any detail about) and make it fresh and new without bastardizing it. Kagawa has managed to do just that.

Ethan is an imminently relatable character. Yes he is supposed to be a loner, outsider and all of that – but the reasons why he is such are what make him someone we all can relate to. He has a deep compassion and goodness that speaks to anyone. And the difficulty fitting in and worry about hurting others is something most have felt.

The faerie worlds created seem vivid and real. I would like to know more about them and the history and such, but I understand that is one of the problems coming into a series anywhere other than the first. I will just have to go back and read the rest of the books to get my backstory. Which is as it should be.

The prose of the book is excellent. It has a very modern feel and moves very quickly. The new takes on some familiar characters is fun and quirky. Overall the entire book has a fresh feel with a hint of darkness. It contains elements of some of the most popular genres without being cookie cutter. There are hints of steampunk and vampire, but on the whole it is a unique and fully created world.

 

I was provided a copy of the book for review.